Truly Original Art by Kelly Shoemaker News http://kellyshoemakerart.com The latest news from Truly Original Art by Kelly Shoemaker. en-us Mon, 16 Jul 2018 22:26:39 CDT Mon, 16 Jul 2018 22:26:39 CDT http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss You Flayed my Thin Skin, but I Still Won't be Your Pumpkin Doll <img width="550" height="229" align="left" alt="" src="/admin/../resources/img/blog_img/7121/_t_be_your_Pumpkin_Doll._Kelly_Shoemaker.PNG" /><div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I realize this title is pretty wild. I'll get to that part soon, I promise! I recently participated in a big art fair. I was skeptical about doing so. Large events are not part of my comfort zone. However, the producer of the show, and a few friends of mine assured me I should do the show. So, I went for it.&nbsp; I was pleasantly surprised by the number of people who had wonderful positive comments about my work. Let's face it, this is not&nbsp; mainstream stuff.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>As pleased as I was about the positive comments, I was even more discouraged and hurt by several rude, negative comments. Whenever I do a show, I expect some of this. But, no matter how prepared I am, the negative stuff still hurts. A lot. I will never forget some of them. As we drove home from the show, exhausted and depressed, I told my husband I would not do any more fairs. Ever. In fact, I considered giving up my weird style of Art altogether. I toyed with the idea of painting landscapes or puppies. (Or Pumpkins with Raggedy Andy Dolls.)</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>That was on Saturday night. On Tuesday, I painted the piece shown here. I had a stack of old garage sale paintings in my studio, gifted to me by a friend for the purpose of re-using the canvas. I selected one that was perfect for this project, and got to work, angry and defiant. Why should I let a few rude people determine how I should express myself? I shouldn't. I wouldn't. </div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I have to admit the finished piece is not one of my favorites, but I found that when I lined up the progression photos of the process, the image was quite interesting. In this case, allowing the process to be a part of the Art made the work stronger. </div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Maybe I should take a lesson from my artwork. Maybe I should let negative comments make me stronger, instead of letting them defeat me. That's something for me to think about. I am confident that my choice to keep my "weird" style, is the right one. But, I don't think I'll be doing any more large art shows. At least not for a while.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div> Sat, 24 Feb 2018 16:21:08 CST What...This Old Thing? <img src="/admin/../resources/img/blog_img/7121/IMG_20171122_132740_kindlephoto_33831323.jpg" width="250" height="623" align="left" alt="" /> <div>"What...This Old Thing? " oil on canvas, 8X 20 inches.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Why is it so difficult for most women to accept a compliment? No matter how hard we work, or how much a part of ourselves our accomplishments are, we (Many of us) seem to have difficulty claiming these accomplishments as our own. I have a few theories as to why this is.&nbsp; </div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One, we have been taught that it is impolite or boastful to admit our own success.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Two, we have conditioned ourselves to be prepared for disappointment, and simply don't know how to respond when confronted with praise.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Three, we want everyone to think our successes came to us easily, that we are so accomplished and skilled we hardly had to exert any effort at all to achieve the desired results.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Whatever the reason, I think it is important for women in particular to think about their response to a compliment before responding. Let's re-condition ourselves. Claim that success, it's yours, and you worked damn hard for it. Be prepared for positive responses to your work, and just say "Thank you" with no conditions attached. You've earned it.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Find this painting soon at <a href="https://www.etsy.com/shop/TrulyOriginalArt">Truly Original Art on Etsy.</a></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div> Wed, 22 Nov 2017 12:55:17 CST "Could There be Something Missing?" <div><img src="/admin/../resources/img/blog_img/7121/18342534_1044563719013079_2762552311756678769_n.jpg" width="600" height="252" alt="" /></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>This photo shows the progression of one of my recent paintings titled "Could There be Something Missing?" This is a 24x48 oil painting on canvas. The image to the far right is the finished piece. This happens to be a self portrait. I started out this piece contemplating areas in which &nbsp;I could be lacking. Do I lack compassion? Knowledge? The ability to see things from another perspective? </div><div>It could also be taken more literally. As an artist, I often struggle with knowing when a painting is finished. Does it say enough without being overly busy? </div><div>Also, I find irony in the fact that I first included the arm in this painting, but I didn't like the look of it, so I painted it out. I missed it after it was gone. It felt like there was in fact "something missing," so I painted it back in again; The whole process of which goes nicely with the title! If you notice, I also started this piece with only one leg, but ended up with two. The piece seemed to lack balance without it. (No pun intended!)</div><div>So, I suppose this painting is primarily about self contemplation, taking a step back and seeing your own flaws, using your knowledge of those flaws to make improvements as you move forward. But, as I often do with my paintings, it also explores irony and literal meaning as well.</div><div> I hope you enjoy this painting. It is currently for sale at:</div><div><a href="https://www.etsy.com/shop/TrulyOriginalArt">&nbsp;Www.TrulyOriginalArt.Etsy.com</a></div> Thu, 24 Aug 2017 10:30:30 CDT Carnival Tricks, Series <div><img src="/admin/../resources/img/blog_img/7121/IMG_20170504_121344_kindlephoto_61580993.jpg" width="600" height="312" border="3" align="left" alt="" /></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>This is my latest little series, "Carnival Tricks." &nbsp;It is just a fun series, experimenting with new painting techniques and figure distortions. The first piece I call "Backbend." The second is "Handwalker aka &nbsp;Moonrise." And the third is "Up and Over." I guess it was time for a break from heavy meanings in my work! I am enjoying this process, starting with a bright single color underpainting, and then working out the figure in a darker but complimentary overpainting. The contortions of the figures here were both fun and challenging!</div><div>You will soon be able to find this series at <a href="https://www.etsy.com/shop/trulyoriginalart">Www.TrulyOriginalArt.Etsy.com&nbsp;</a></div> Thu, 04 May 2017 11:59:07 CDT "Uptight" and "Fitting In" <div>In these two paintings, I am exploring themes of feeling uncomfortable in one's own skin. I think we are all familiar with these feelings, so, considering the titles, these two pieces are pretty self-explanatory. This first piece, in yellow, is titled "Uptight" it is 10 inches square, oil on canvas board.</div><div><img src="/admin/../resources/img/blog_img/7121/IMG_20170327_151519_kindlephoto_271395128.jpg" width="300" height="293" alt="" />&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The second piece, in pink, is titled "Fitting In" and is also oil on canvas board, 10 inches square.&nbsp;</div><div><img src="/admin/../resources/img/blog_img/7121/IMG_20170318_220415.jpg" width="300" height="225" alt="" />&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I tried something a little different than my usual technique with these two pieces, and I love the results. I started with a really bright single color underpainting, then used more neutral tones in the overpainting, but allowed the underpainting to show through, and provide the majority of the color in the piece. I enjoyed this process, and the result, I think, is great.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>These two pieces will soon be available for sale at <a href="https://www.etsy.com/shop/TrulyOriginalArt">Www.TrulyOriginalArt.Etsy.com</a>. &nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div> Tue, 28 Mar 2017 09:14:44 CDT